September 18, 2014
yuqqy:

David Hockney

yuqqy:

David Hockney

(via ennui-or-something)

September 18, 2014

September 18, 2014

recent

September 18, 2014
occhiolism

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the awareness of the smallness of your perspective, by which you couldn’t possibly draw any meaningful conclusions at all, about the world or the past or the complexities of culture, because although your life is an epic and unrepeatable anecdote, it still only has a sample size of one, and may end up being the control for a much wilder experiment happening in the next room.

(via goslinq)

September 18, 2014
"She never looked nice. She looked like art, and art wasn’t supposed to look nice; it was supposed to make you feel something."

Eleanor & Park, Rainbow Rowell  (via oddi-tea)

(Source: franstar, via goslinq)

September 11, 2014

(Source: marlyinmay, via goslinq)

September 11, 2014

okayafrica:

VIDEO:Introducing French Afro-Cuban Twin Sisters Ibeyi & Their Yoruba Doom Soul

Ibeyi, made up of Cuban-born, Paris-based twin sisters Naomi and Lisa-Kaindé Díaz, is an electronic doom soul duo who are forging a new spiritual sound with their debut EP Oya. The 19-year-old musicians are XL Recordings‘ newest signees, and their introductory singles “Oya” and “River” possess a hypnotic blend of hip-hop, electronica, and blues infused with Yoruba prayers and folk songs that will transport you to a higher realm upon first listen.

Singing in French, English, Spanish and Yoruba, Ibeyi count among their primary influences Nina Simone, Meshell Ndegeocello, James Blake and their late father, the celebrated Cuban jazz percussionist Miguel “Anga” Diaz. Ibeyi’s vocal range, which wavers from the raspy and wraith-like to the sonorous and divine, is ideal for their sonic palette which revels in the phantasmagorical groove of liturgical Yoruba songs. Besides singing in Yoruba–which was brought to Cuba by West African slaves–Ibeyi honor their father’s legacy and Afro-Cuban heritage through their percussive production and use of live instruments. Beatsmith Naomi plays both the cajón and the batá while Lisa-Kaindé remains more in tune with the musical mythos of Ibeyi’s sound by weaving Yoruba lore deeply into their lyrics. “River” is dedicated to the goddess Oshun (the mother of the Ibeyi, and their first single and EP are both named for  Oya (the benevolent orisha who took the Ibeyi in after Oshun was accused of witchcraft for birthing twins and kicked them out).

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(via lakemermaids)

September 11, 2014

(Source: R2--D2, via lonelyworlddd)

September 11, 2014

l-o-t-h-o-r:

A series of photographs taken by ‘Bruce Davidson’ entitled ‘Brooklyn Gang’ He followed a group of teenaged who claimed the streets of Brooklyn NY as their turf.

“I found myself involved with a group of unpredictable youths who were mostly indifferent to me. In time, they allowed me to witness their fear, depression, and anger. I soon realized that I, too, was feeling some of their pain. In staying close to them, I uncovered my own feelings of failure, frustration, and rage.”

(Source: exprexs, via waliehoody)

September 11, 2014
corregida:


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corregida:

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(via goodtimesroll)

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